Weather Information

  1. Floods
  2. Thunderstorms
  3. Hurricanes
  4. Tornados
Perhaps the biggest cause of flood-related deaths and injuries is lack of public understanding of the severity and danger involved with floods and flash floods. The following tips can help protect you during flood events.

  • Many people are killed by driving or walking on roads and bridges that are covered by water. Even though the water might look only inches deep, it could be much deeper and have strong currents. A mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles. This includes pickups and SUVs. (Source: National Weather Service)
  • Flooded creeks and streams are unpredictable. Even though the surface water may be smooth the water is moving very fast.
  • High water in streets and intersections will quickly stall motor vehicles. Most trucks, four-wheel drives, and sport utility vehicles also are susceptible to being swept away by high water. Such vehicles often give motorists a false sense of security, believing the vehicles are safe under any conditions.
  • If you are approaching a flooded roadway, turn around and take an alternate route, even though vehicles in front of you may have passed through the high water.
  • If your car stalls, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles.
  • Never let children play near creeks or storm drains when the water is rising or high. Swimming skills have nothing to do with surviving a flooded creek or stream.
  • Debris or garbage in the water may include tires, shopping carts, furniture etc. These items can easily injure or trap a person under water.
  • Flooded streams and rivers are not safe for recreational boating. Many canoeists and kayakers have been rescued from dangerous rapids in flood-swollen streams and rivers.
What  If Someone Falls in or is Trapped in Flood Water

  • Do not go after the victim!
  • If possible, throw them victim something to use as a flotation device (spare tire, large ball or foam ice chest).
  • Call 911 with correct location information on this water rescue situation.
  • Never set up a tent or camper on the bank of a river or stream. It is best to allow some distance between the campsite and water so if a flash flood does occur, you will have more time to move to higher ground.
  • If you live in a low-lying area or near a creek, pay close attention to water levels during heavy rain events. Water levels rise rapidly during flash floods, often surprising victims. Heavy rainfall upstream can cause a river or stream to rise quickly, even if it is not raining near you. Be prepared to move quickly to higher round if water levels begin rising. Quickly responding to an evacuation order can save your life.
  • If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Follow recommended evacuation routes. Shortcuts may be blocked.
View this link to learn more about the Turn Around Don't Drown program from the National Weather Service.
Information for Kids